john galsworthy John Galsworthy – The Man of Property

John Galsworthy viewed English society from within the world of upper bourgeoisie. He did not show much interest in the great world beyond and beneath his class, though in his plays he expressed a deep sense of revolt against social injustice in contemporary society. Late-Victorian and post-Victorian life is criticized in his novels by exposing not the miseries of the poor but the complacency of the aquisitive possessive rich… read more

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oscar wilde Oskar Wilde – Art for Art’s Sake

The Happy Prince is a statue which sees from the pedestal on which it is placed the sad and miserable life of the poor inhabitants of the town over which the Happy Prince ruled when he was alive. A little swallow which had remained behind, when its companions flew to Egypt in autumn, consented to become the statue’s messenger and help the suffering poor by bringing them the precious stones which were the statue’s eyes, the ruby encrusted on its sword-hilt, and the gold leaves with which it was covered. The swallow became so attached to the statue, when it became blind and bare, that it could not leave it and go to Egypt any more although it was winter. In the end it died of cold… read more

gbs George Bernard Shaw – The Welfare and the Misery

Shaw took great pleasure in ridiculing, upsetting, scandalizing his public, for his object was to satirize, not the invented characters in the plays, but the audience. In this connection he himself tells us: “I must warn my readers that my attacks are directed against themselves, not against my stage figures,” because the readers, the audience, the public, tolerated the state of affairs against Shaw rose… read more

 

ehErnest Hemingway – The Man and the Society

After eighty-four luckless days, the solitary fisherman, Santiago – the hero of the Hemingway’s novel – rows his skiff far out to sea, and hooks a giant marlin in the Gulf Stream. The fish tows him farther out to sea but Santiago holds on until after two days and two nights of monumental struggle… read more